Libyan slavery, a human panachronism in this XXIth century

Lire la version française

Author : Uriel N’GBATONGO. Translated by : Donatien BERTAUD.

As this new year 2018 begins, it seems important to approach a fact “revealed to the world” at the end of 2017 but still terribly part of current affairs, slave trade in Libya. Already Known and denounced for years now in the more concerned circles by African current affairs, Libyan slavery was revealed for all to see in November 2017 by a CNN reporter’s video showing the auction sale of black people presented as mere tool of exploitation. In order to get a good understanding of the nature and causes of such a phenomenon which we good believe impossible in our time, it is necessary to have a global vision of the geopolitical and historic context in which it takes roots. Indeed, the fact is that this new form of slave trade across the Sahara appears as a negative blowback from a country prey to chaos since the fall of its authoritarian leader and each time more important flow of migrants in search of a better life on the European continent.

The Libyan havoc, hysteresis of the fall of Gaddafi’s regimen

Once seen as a symbol of success amidst African nations and one of the few countries having the force to revendicate its Pan-Africanism, Libya is only nowadays the shadow of what it once was. The day after the failure of a regime change which had the ambition to be democratic at the beginning, Saïd Haddad, a researcher at the IREMAN (Institut de recherche et d’étude sur le monde arabe et musulman, research institute on Arabic and Muslim world), wondered rightly if the term of failed state wasn’t applicable to this territory. Destroyed by the bombings and internal wars an after taste of the democratization of the Libyan regime, the propagation of armed militias and the transitional political crisis have brought an all-encompassing chaos in the country since the death of Gaddafi. Indeed, the country is presently divided in two political and military centers of influence. To the East, seated in Tobruk a parliament presided by Aguila Saleh Issa and to the west in Tripoli, is seated the Government of national accord with Fayez al-Sarraj as its head. To this is added an internal conflict due to numerous tribes to the South of the country which refused to recognized the authority of Tripoli.

The evident failure of the fall of Gaddafi’s regimen, without doubt rushed by the foreign policy of Western countries, if not to say France, has only contributed to the creation of lawless gray areas where mercenaries and militias involved in slave trade are freely doing business. However, this reality in place since 2011, the date of the fall of Gaddafi’s regimen, was especially absent in western media much to the despair of NGOs such as Amnesty International or Migreurop.  Furthermore, the choc wasn’t this great in western population when CNN revealed to the world what was really happening in Libya. The problem is that we are facing here a situation similar to the wake of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq: the success of a military operation which has contributed to destroy a country more than giving it new basis, the unspeakable politic reality of a military success.

Slavery across the Sahara, an historical innovation?

The world therefore had a question in mind : How can slave trade “officially banned” and disapproved by this “fantastic paper” the Human rights charter still exist nowadays ?

First of all, it is important to notice that the phenomenon of slave trade across the Sahara is taking roots in the history of relations between Arab Africa also known as white Africa, North of the Continent and the so called “black” Africa South of the Sahara. Most of the time, when we are speaking about slave trade, we think of slave trade across this Atlantic also known as “triangular trade”, to those western slave ships shipping African “ebony wood” to the American exploitation fields. Effectively; for a good reason in consideration of the importance of the phenomenon which according to the Nigerian historian Joseph Inikori made more than 112 million victims. Nevertheless, another slavery phenomenon without a doubt less known by the most European centered of this time was ravaging Africa as well, the Arab slave trade across the Sahara. If the flows of deportation across the Sahara were less important in term of quantity than the triangular trade ones, they lasted for a much longer period than the latter. Indeed, beginning during the Middle ages, slave trade across the Atlantic, only ended in the XXth century. Speaking of this I can only advise you to read Le genocide voilé ( the veiled genocide) from the Senegalese anthropologist and economist, Tidiane N’Diaye, who, justly, deals about Arab slave trade, a slave trade which lasted thirteen century against “only “ four for the slave trade across the Atlantic. With his book Le genocide voilé ( the veiled genocide) as a medium he realizes a subtle analysis of the specificity of Arab slave trade, a key element to understand the mechanism of the new Libyan slavery. He deals with western slavery and explains how the market value of  “ebony wood” imposed a relative “maintenance” of the goods. That’s why, the avaricious nature of the master imposed him to take care of the health of his niggers ( a logic fundamentally opposed to all forms of mass genocide). However, he explains that the Arab slave trade, openly tolerated by the most rigorous religious authorities, was marked first and foremost by a profound racism against the Black people, a sub-race of which it was necessary to impede the reproduction. Much more than a simple deportation, the philosophy of Arab slave trade was marked by a violent nihilistic logic, if not to say genocidal, against Blacks. They were not only sold to feed caravan trade across the Sahara, or again is the less virtuous of the Muslim harems, they were subject to torture, barbarian physical acts, or even forced castrations. This is exactly what we are seeing reemerge nowadays. Through the testimonies of the ones who managed by luck to escape this Libyan slave channels, in those we learn that far from being a slave trade, it is the sequestration and the torture of hundreds of blacks which is taking place now in Libya. Much more than the simple corollary of an amoral economic opportunism which makes a free workforce out of Black people, this is in fact the consequence of the return of a Negrophobia which pursue an only aim : destroy a people of parasite migrants and obtain money out of them. For this, most of the kidnappers have put in place an efficient system. They capture migrants looking for the Mediterranean cost and stage tortures during phone calls to their families to force them to send money. It goes without saying that during their captivity, they are subject to victimization and physical humiliation. The babies and children are eliminated without consideration, and women are reduced to the state of sexual objects when they are not killed because of their weakness.

Libye 2

The hypocrisy of a system ?

Slavery is not new as a fact. Even worst, looking carefully it seems to be the result of an international system turned towards an only thing : private interest. Million of children are working to make clothes in the less regarding subcontracting factory of the economic and commercial international system without getting much attention from the governments and other world organization. A large variety of nations are involved in this topic, from Côte d’Ivoire and its children working in cacao plantation to manufacturing plants in China, passing by Uzbekistan cotton fields and its state’s slavery. In brief, believing that there is no power relationship and interest creating a hierarchy of human kind would only be the proof of intellectual dishonesty or of an absolute ingenuity. Africa maintains and it’s a well establish fact asymmetric relations with other continents, and this is the case on almost all aspects. As it was proven by the recurrent migratory facts toward Europe, the domination relationship on the psychological, sociological and economical front exerted by Europeans over Africa is clear. Furthermore, western interference in Africa is a reality which has been verified on different point. From a political perspective the succession since the sixties of western centered political pawn at the head of African Nations is a peculiarly manifest fact. If the now famous scandal of “Bokasa’s diamond” is presently known by everyone, another case is still the death of Thomas Sankara, former president of Burkina Faso. He rose to power in 1983 before being killed by as it is said men of Blaise Compaoré, its successor, Sankara was already a nuisance for the France of Mitterand by his impertinent Pan-Africanism and anti-imperialism against former colonial powers (For instance he would support the independence movement in New Caledonia). If his death is still a mystery today numerous investigations are pointing a French implication in the death of such a troublesome African head of state. In this optic, the news report “Ombre africaine” (African shadow) published in 2009 on the italian Channel Rai 3 and directed by Silvestro Montarano, put into question using numerous testimonies the reality of a western interference in the death of Sankara.

On the economic standpoint, I can only advise you to read the debate which has been raised by Nezha Hami Eddine Mazili, economist and specialist of Africa who in Le Franc CFA, la plus grande arnaque de l’histoire (Franc CFA : the biggest scam in history) analyses one of the vestige of colonial times.

In this optic, believing that this slavery issue wasn’t known by European authorities, prey to waves of migration is wrong. On the contrary, the European Union, by its choices to manage the African migrants has demonstrated its limits regarding its supposed philanthropy. Indeed, not satisfied by silencing for years what was happening in Libya, the highest authorities in European politics have contributed to the maintain of this phenomenon by financing directly detention camps on the Libyan soil.

Libye 3

As such, the hypocrisy of a general public empathy toward those ill-treated humans only seems in reality to serve a political apathy of nations which would have to respond to the following statement : « Avec nos excuses, nous ne construisons rien ; nous confessons seulement nos inactions ou lâchetés » (Chemins parsemés d’immortelles pensées, M. Bouthot). “” With our excuses, we don’t build anything ; we only confess our lack of action or cowardice” ( Paths scattered with immortal thoughts, M. Bouthot).

SOURCES :

–          http://libeafrica4.blogs.liberation.fr/2018/01/10/lesclavage-transsaharien/

–          http://www.radiopanik.org/actus/manifestation-contre-l-esclavage-en-libye-et-dans-le-monde

–          http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2017/11/29/esclavage-en-libye-personne-ne-protege-les-africains-alors-chacun-peut-faire-son-marche_5222200_3212.html

–          https://la1ere.francetvinfo.fr/2014/04/29/l-autre-esclavage-un-apercu-de-la-traite-arabo-musulmane-147531.html

–          http://lavieeco.com/news/debat-chroniques/le-franc-cfa-la-plus-grande-arnaque-de-lhistoire.html

–          https://humanite.fr/la-libye-theatre-et-enjeu-regional-553576

–          http://journals.openedition.org/anneemaghreb/2588

 

L’esclavagisme libyen, un parachronisme humain au XXIème siècle

Auteur : Uriel N’GBATONGO.

Alors que commence cette nouvelle année 2018, il semble être important d’aborder un fait « révélé au monde » en fin d’année 2017 mais toujours terriblement d’actualité, la traite des noirs en Libye. Déjà connu et dénoncé depuis des années dans les milieux les plus concernés par l’actualité africaine, l’esclavagisme libyen fut révélé à tous en novembre 2017 par une vidéo de journalistes du CNN montrant la vente aux enchères de noirs présentés comme de simples objets d’exploitation. Pour bien comprendre la nature et les causes d’un tel phénomène, que l’on pourrait croire impossible à notre époque, il est nécessaire d’avoir une vision globale du contexte géopolitique et historique dans lequel il prend racine. En effet, le fait est que cette nouvelle forme de traite transsaharienne apparaît comme la rétroaction négative d’un pays en proie au chaos depuis la chute de son leader autoritaire et de flux toujours plus importants de migrants en quête d’une vie meilleure sur le continent européen. 

Le chaos libyen, hystérèse de la chute du régime Kadhafi

Autrefois considéré comme un symbole de réussite parmi les nations Africaine et comme un des rares pays ayant la force de revendiquer son panafricanisme, la Libye d’aujourd’hui n’est plus que l’ombre d’elle-même. Au lendemain de l’échec d’une transition de régime qui se voulait démocratique à ses débuts, Saïd Haddad, chercheur associé à l’IREMAM (Institut de recherche et d’étude sur le monde arabe et musulman), se demandait à juste titre si le qualificatif d’Etat failli ne s’appliquerait pas à ce territoire. Détruit par les bombardements et une guerre intestine aux arrières goûts de démocratisation du régime libyen, la propagation de milices armées et la crise politique de transition font de ce pays un chaos total depuis la mort de Kadhafi. En effet, le pays est actuellement divisé en deux centres d’influences politico-militaires. A l’est, siège à Tobrouk un parlement présidé par Aguila Saah Issa et à l’ouest à Tripoli, siège le gouvernement d’entente national dirigé par Fayez el-Sarraj. A cela s’ajoute un conflit interne lié à de nombreuses tribus au Sud du pays ne reconnaissant pas l’autorité de Tripoli.

L’échec évident de la chute du régime Kadhafi, sans aucun doute précipité par la politique extérieure de pays Occidentaux, pour ne pas citer la France, n’a fait que contribuer à la mise en place de zones grises de non-droit où mercenaires et milices négrières font librement leurs affaires. Et pourtant, cette réalité apparente depuis 2011, soit la chute du régime Kadhafi, fut particulièrement absente des médias occidentaux au plus grand désespoir d’ONG tels qu’Amnesty International ou encore Migreurop. Aussi, tel ne fut pas la surprise des populations occidentales lorsque CNN dévoila au monde ce qui se passe réellement en Libye. Le problème est que nous faisons ici face à une situation similaire à celle du lendemain des guerres en Afghanistan et en Irak : le succès d’une opération militaire ayant contribué à détruire un pays plus qu’à ne lui donner de nouvelles bases ; l’ineffable réalité politique d’un succès militaire.

L’esclavage transsaharien, une novation historique ?

Le monde avait alors une question en tête : comment la traite négrière, pourtant « officiellement abolie » et désapprouvée par ce « merveilleux papier » qu’est la charte des droits de l’homme, peut-elle être toujours d’actualité ?

En premier lieu, il est important de noter que le phénomène esclavagiste transsaharien prend ses racines dans l’histoire même des relations transsahariennes entre l’Afrique arabisée dite « blanche » au Nord et l’Afrique dite « noire » au Sud du Sahara. Bien souvent, lorsque l’on parle de la traite des noirs, on pense à la traite atlantique autrement appelée « commerce triangulaire », à ces navires négriers occidentaux transportant le « bois d’ébène » africains vers les champs d’exploitations américains. À juste titre d’ailleurs au vu de l’ampleur du phénomène qui fît selon l’estimation de l’historien nigérian Joseph Inikori, plus de 112 millions de victimes. Néanmoins, un autre phénomène esclavagiste sans doute moins connu des plus européo-centré de l’époque faisait tout autant rage en Afrique, la traite maghrébine transsaharienne. Si les flux de déportations transsahariens furent moins important quantitativement parlant que ceux du commerce triangulaire, ils durèrent bien plus longtemps que ces derniers. En effet, commencée au Moyen-Age, la traite transatlantique ne prit fin qu’au XXème siècle. À ce titre je ne peux que suggérer la lecture du livre Le génocide voilé de l’anthropologue et économiste sénégalais Tidiane N’Diaye qui, à juste titre, aborde la traite maghrébine, traite ayant duré treize siècles contre « seulement » quatre pour la traite atlantique. À travers Le génocide voilé il réalise une analyse très fine des spécificités de la traite maghrébine, chose ô combien utile pour comprendre les mécanismes du néo-esclavagisme libyen. Abordant l’esclavagisme occidental, il explique comment la valeur marchande du « bois d’ébène » imposait un relatif « entretien » de la marchandise noire. Dès lors, la conscience vénale du maître lui imposait un certain intérêt pour la santé de ses nègres (logique en soi opposé à toute forme de génocide de masse). Cependant, il explique que la traite maghrébine, ouvertement cautionné par les autorités religieuses les plus strictes, fut marqué avant toute chose par un racisme profond envers le peuple noir, une sous-race dont il fallait empêcher la reproduction. Bien plus qu’une simple déportation, la philosophie de la traite maghrébine était empreinte d’une logique nihiliste violente, pour ne pas dire génocidaire, envers les noirs. Ces derniers, en plus d’être vendu en pâture au négoce caravanier saharien, ou encore dans les harems musulmans les moins vertueux, subissaient des tortures, des actes de barbarie physiques, ou encore des castrations forcées.

C’est justement ce que l’on voit réapparaitre aujourd’hui. À travers le témoignage de ceux qui ont pu par chance échapper au circuit esclavagiste libyen, on apprend que bien loin d’être une traite, c’est la séquestration et la mise sous torture de centaines de noirs qui a lieu en ce moment en Libye. Bien plus que le simple corollaire d’un opportunisme économique amoral faisant des noirs une main-d’œuvre gratuite, c’est bel et bien la conséquence du retour d’une “négrophobie” ne visant qu’à une chose : détruire un peuple de migrants parasites et obtenir sur leur tête de l’argent. Pour cela, la plupart des ravisseurs ont mis en place des systèmes bien rodés. Ils capturent les migrants en quête de la côte méditerranéenne et organisent les tortures lors d’appels téléphoniques à leur famille afin que ces dernières envoient de l’argent. Il va sans dire que pendant leur captivité, ils subissent brimades et humiliations physiques. Les bébés et les enfants sont éliminés sans aucune considération, et les femmes sont réduites à l’état de simples objets sexuels quand elles ne sont pas tuées car trop faibles. 

Libye 2

L’hypocrisie d’un système ?

Le fait esclavagiste n’est pas quelque chose de nouveau en soi. Pire encore, à bien y regarder, il ne semble être que la donnée d’un système international tourné vers une seule chose : l’intérêt particulier. Des millions d’enfants travaillent pour faire des vêtements dans les usines sous-traitantes les moins scrupuleuses du système économico-commercial international sans que ceci ne préoccupe beaucoup les gouvernements et autres organisations mondiales. À ce sujet, une multitude nations sont concernés, de la Côte d’Ivoire et ses enfants travaillant dans les plantations de cacaos aux usines manufacturières chinoises, en passant par les champs de cotons ouzbeks et son esclavagisme étatisé. Bref, croire qu’il n’y aurait pas de rapports de forces et d’intérêts régissant une hiérarchie de l’humanité serait faire preuve d’une malhonnêteté intellectuelle ou d’une ingénuité absolue. A ce titre, l’Afrique entretient bel et bien des relations asymétriques avec les autres continents. En effet, l’ingérence occidentale en Afrique est une réalité avérée selon plusieurs points de vue. D’un point de vue politique, l’alternance depuis les années 60 de pions politiques occidentalo-centrés à la tête des Etats africains est un fait particulièrement manifeste. Si la désormais célèbre polémique des « diamants Bokassa » est maintenant connue de tous, un autre cas le reste sans doute moins, celui de la mort de Thomas Sankara, ex-président du Burkina Faso. Arrivé au pouvoir en 1983 avant d’être assassiné par dit-on des hommes de Blaise Compaoré, son successeur, Sankara gênait déjà la France de Mitterrand par son panafricaniste outrecuidant et son anti-impérialisme à l’encontre des anciennes puissances coloniales (il soutiendra par exemple l’indépendantisme en Nouvelle Calédonie). Si sa mort reste à ce jour un mystère, de nombreuses investigations pointent du doigt une implication française dans la mort de ce chef d’Etat africain ô combien dérangeant. Dans cette optique, le reportage « Ombre africaine » diffusé en 2009 sur la chaîne Italienne Rai 3 et réalisé par Silvestro Montanaro, questionne par ces nombreux témoignages la réalité d’une ingérence occidentale dans la mort de Sankara.

Du point de vue économique, je ne peux que conseiller la lecture du débat porté par Nezha Hami Eddine Mazili, économiste spécialiste de l’Afrique qui dans Le Franc CFA, la plus grande arnaque de l’histoire analyse un des reliquats de l’époque coloniale.

Dans cette optique, croire que le fait négrier était inconnu des instances européennes alors en proie à des vagues de migrants est faux. Au contraire, l’Union Européenne, par ses choix de gestion des migrants africains a démontré ses limites quant à sa philanthropie supposée. En effet, non content de taire depuis des années ce qui se passait en Libye, les plus hautes instances politiques européennes ont contribué au maintien du phénomène en finançant directement les camps de détention sur le sol libyen.

Libye 3

Dès lors, l’hypocrisie d’une générale empathie publique envers ces humains maltraités ne semble servir en réalité qu’une apathie politique de nations qui répondraient bien de la phrase suivante : « Avec nos excuses, nous ne construisons rien ; nous confessons seulement nos inactions ou lâchetés » (Chemins parsemés d’immortelles pensées, M. Bouthot).

SOURCES :

–          http://libeafrica4.blogs.liberation.fr/2018/01/10/lesclavage-transsaharien/

–          http://www.radiopanik.org/actus/manifestation-contre-l-esclavage-en-libye-et-dans-le-monde

–          http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2017/11/29/esclavage-en-libye-personne-ne-protege-les-africains-alors-chacun-peut-faire-son-marche_5222200_3212.html

–          https://la1ere.francetvinfo.fr/2014/04/29/l-autre-esclavage-un-apercu-de-la-traite-arabo-musulmane-147531.html

–          http://lavieeco.com/news/debat-chroniques/le-franc-cfa-la-plus-grande-arnaque-de-lhistoire.html

–          https://humanite.fr/la-libye-theatre-et-enjeu-regional-553576

–         http://journals.openedition.org/anneemaghreb/2588

–          http://thomassankara.net/relations-france-burkina-quand-la-france-detestait-sankara/

–          http://webdoc.rfi.fr/burkina-faso-qui-a-fait-tuer-sankara/chap-04/index.html

–          http://information.tv5monde.com/afrique/thomas-sankara-la-fin-du-secret-defense-en-france-une-verite-etablir-206158

–          http://www.jeuneafrique.com/187020/politique/assassinat-de-thomas-sankara-un-documentaire-voque-la-cia/

                                                  

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s